Sunday, March 11, 2012

In memory

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City on March 25, 1911, was the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the city of New York and resulted in the fourth highest loss of life from an industrial accident in U.S. history. It was also the second deadliest disaster in New York City – after the burning of the General Slocum on June 15, 1904 – until the destruction of the World Trade Center 90 years later. The fire caused the deaths of 146 garment workers, who died from the fire, smoke inhalation, or falling to their deaths. Most of the victims were recent Jewish and Italian immigrant women aged sixteen to twenty-three the oldest victim was 48, the youngest were two fourteen-year-old girls.
Because the managers had locked the doors to the stairwells and exits – a common practice at the time to prevent pilferage and unauthorized breaks – many of the workers who could not escape the burning building jumped from the eighth, ninth, and tenth floors to the streets below. The fire led to legislation requiring improved factory safety standards and helped spur the growth of the ladies union, which fought for better working conditions for sweatshop workers.
The factory was located in the Asch Building, at 23-29 Washington Place, now known as the Brown building, which has been designated a New York City landmark..
We have all heard of these sweatshop conditions and I just wanted to draw attention to the lost lives of these innocent women who were only trying to make a living.  I know the needlework that we do doesn't come close to the work that these ladies had to perform on a daily basis, but I think as fellow needlewomen, we should remember them....they deserve that.  If you would like to read more about this tragic accident, please visit:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangle_Shirtwaist_Factory_fire
Blessings as always,
Barbara


9 comments:

Catherine said...

I remember studying this and doing a report in high school. Such horrid conditions they worked and died under.

Rebecca said...

Just FYI--There is a great documentary that was done on the Triangle factory and the fire. It is available on Netflix if you have that service.

Krista said...

What a tragedy. Thank you for the link to the story and the post.

April said...

Barbara thanks for the post and the link. Very interesting.

Lelia said...

I read a book on this - historical fiction

Ashes of Roses

thx for your post

Sweet Sue said...

Yes indeed, these innocent victims deserve our remembrance. Thx for posting and the link.

Rita said...

Thanks for reminding us abou this. I remember reading about it many years ago, thinking of the horror it must have been for those poor people.

Rachel S-H said...

Thank you for the reminder.

Lynn said...

Growing up in Canada, I was not aware of this tragic event. Thank you so much for sharing it with us. These victims deserve to be remembered.